Monday, September 19, 2011

Exhumation of Pius X


He had passed away thirty years before when this photograph was taken during the exhumation.

15 comments:

  1. JP,

    Thanks for sharing this photo. I have a devotion to His Holiness and this just made my day! I have a question though, would his body be classified as "incorrupt" from that state? Thanks and I pray for you & your family's continued strength and happiness!

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  2. On May 20, 1944, this photo was taken. As can be seen, the body was discovered to be "fu ritrovato pressoché intatto" (discovered nearly intact). Also, there had been no embalming when he died according to his explicit desires.

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  3. Oh, my goodness-I've never seen this before! He looks almost...scary!
    I guess this is what happens when a body isn't embalmed, right?

    Barb

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  4. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fa/Tomb_of_pope_Pius_X.jpg

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  5. Sancte Pater, sic transit gloria mundi

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  6. As can be seen he is incorrupt. It is not a skull, but a face.

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  7. Hmm....Give it a few years. It looks pretty skeletal to me.

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  8. The Italians have a very different idea of "incorrupt" than do most of us.
    Bit it does no harm.

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  9. Pius X pray for us!

    He obviously wasn't incorrupt though (except maybe by crazy Italian standards)

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  10. John,
    where did you find this photo? I have an extensive library of Pius X books and have never seen it published before?
    BTW, it is true that the flesh was white; there are still relics of the exterior skin taken from the body that are white/fleshy in colour. There may have been some deterioration, but he was "recognizable" and almost intact. -- Pius IX, on the other hand, was very dark-coloured but still considered incorrupt. Other saints and blesseds have also manifested certain signs of deterioration, but have still been noted as "incorrupt." Only in 5 exceptional cases has the Church used the incorruption of a body as one of the official miracles for canonization. The last of these was Saint Andrew Bobola, SJ. In his case, it was not so much the "beauty" of the body, but the fact that having been terribly mutilated by the tortures of his martyrdom, the body remained unchanged for some 300 years, the wounds exposing the interior of the corpse -- without any putrefaction or alteration. So the incorruption was in service of proving the horrors of his martyrdom.
    In the case of St. Pius X, however, by the 1990s, the body did begin to deteriorate within its glass coffin. It was removed from St. Peter's for several months to be treated. When it was returned, it was noted that the remains had been so thickly wrapped up under the papal vestments that he looked more like John XXIII than himself!

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  11. I don't understand. Why would they do this in 1944 during the war and for what reason? He was beatified in 1951 and canonized in 1954.

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  12. Non mi sembra un corpo incorrotto.

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  13. The pic came from a fabulous new book on the life of Pio X that is available at the gift shop located at the birthplace of Pius X, in his old home in the village of Riese Pio X, located near Padua. Well worth a visit!

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  14. è mummificato, non "incorrotto"

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